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All About IPOs

All About IPOs

Maybe you've heard someone talking about investing in "a hot new IPO" and wondered what all the fuss was about. Or maybe you've heard about a company "going public" and thought about whether you should invest in it. If you're unfamiliar with initial public offerings (IPOs), here's a review of some basics.

What is an IPO?

As the name implies, an initial public offering represents the first time a company issues shares of stock that are available for purchase by the public (in other words, when it "goes public"). The sale of the company's stock is typically intended to attract new capital that the company can use to expand. IPOs might be considered the rock stars of the investing world; when the company has generated a lot of interest leading up to its IPO, the initial response from investors can make headlines.

How does an IPO work?

No Matter What Your Age, Your Social Security Statement Matters

Fifteen years ago, the Social Security Administration (SSA) launched the Social Security Statement, a tool to help Americans understand the features and benefits that Social Security offers. Since then, millions of Americans have reviewed their personalized statements to see a detailed record of their earnings, as well as estimates of retirement, survivor, and disability benefits based on those earnings. Here's how to get a copy of your statement, and why it deserves more than just a quick glance, even if you're years away from retirement.

How do you get your statement?

Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village Receives Go! Grant

Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village Receives Go! Grant

 

Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village would like to announce that it has received a $500 Go! Grant that allowed the museum’s executive director, Herbert Schmidt, to attend the annual Museum Institute at Great Camp Sagamore in the Adirondacks. 

Daemen’s Economic Impact on Region Reaches Nearly $132 Million

Daemen’s Economic Impact on Region Reaches Nearly $132 Million

Daemen College’s economic impact on the Buffalo Niagara region in 2013 reached nearly $132 million, representing a $17 million increase for the Amherst-based institution, according to a new study released today, Jan. 15, by the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities (CICU).

“This substantial figure illustrates Daemen plays a key role in the region’s economic vitality and has emerged as a significant contributor to Western New York’s long-term economic well-being,” said Daemen President Gary A. Olson. “For almost 70 years, Daemen has been actively engaged in this area and we will continue our commitment to growing and thriving with the community.”

Healthy Resolutions Can Pay Off (Literally)

If you made a New Year's Resolution to get healthy, you may get more bang for your resolution buck than you bargained for. That's because healthy habits can benefit your wallet as well as your body.

The link between health and money

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chronic conditions--including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer--account for more than 75% of all health-care costs nationwide. Nearly half of all Americans have a chronic disease, which can lead to other problems that are devastating not just to health but also to a family's finances. People with a chronic condition pay five times more for health care each year, on average, as those without a chronic disease.*

Many chronic diseases can be linked to four behaviors: tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, poor eating habits, and inactivity.* A closer look at each of these behaviors demonstrates the health-money connection.

New IRS Publication helps you understand the Health Care Law

 

There is a new publication that will help you learn about how the Affordable Care Act affects your taxes. IRS Publication 5187, Health Care Law: What’s New for Individuals and Families is now available on IRS.gov/aca. While the health care law has several parts, this publication breaks down what’s new for the 2014 federal tax return you will be filing in 2015.

This new publication provides important information for taxpayers who:

Revised One-Rollover-Per-Year Limit Applies in 2015: IRS Clarifies Rules

Background

The Internal Revenue Code says that if you receive a distribution from an IRA, you can't make a tax-free (60-day) rollover into another IRA if you've already completed a tax-free rollover within the previous one-year (12-month) period. The long-standing position of the IRS was that this rule applied separately to each IRA someone owns. Earlier this year, however, the Tax Court, in the case of Bobrow v. Commissioner, held that, regardless of how many IRAs he or she maintains, a taxpayer may make only one nontaxable 60-day rollover within each 12-month period.

The IRS response to Bobrow