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Tips to Keep in Mind for Taxpayers Traveling for Charity | Business

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Tips to Keep in Mind for Taxpayers Traveling for Charity
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During the summer, some taxpayers may travel because of their involvement with a qualified charity. These traveling taxpayers may be able to lower their taxes.

Here are some tax tips for taxpayers to use when deducting charity-related travel expenses:

·         Qualified Charities.  For a taxpayer to deduct costs, they must volunteer for a qualified charity. Most groups must apply to the IRS to become qualified. Churches and governments are generally qualified, and do not need to apply to the IRS. A taxpayer should ask the group about its status before they donate. Taxpayers can also use the Select Check tool on IRS.gov to check a group’s status.

·         Out-of-Pocket Expenses.  A taxpayer may be able to deduct some of their costs including travel. These out-of-pocket expenses must be necessary while the taxpayer is away from home. All costs must be:

·         Unreimbursed,

·         Directly connected with the services,

·         Expenses the taxpayer had only because of the services the taxpayer gave, and

·         Not personal, living or family expenses.

·         Genuine and Substantial Duty.  The charity work the taxpayer is involved with has to be real and substantial throughout the trip. The taxpayer can’t deduct expenses if they only have nominal duties or do not have any duties for significant parts of the trip.

·         Value of Time or Service.  A taxpayer can’t deduct the value of their time or services that they give to charity. This includes income lost while the taxpayer serves as an unpaid volunteer for a qualified charity.

·         Travel Expenses a Taxpayer Can Deduct.  The types of expenses a taxpayer may be able to deduct include:

·         Air, rail and bus transportation,

·         Car expenses,

·         Lodging costs,

·         Cost of meals, and

·         Taxi or other transportation costs between the airport or station and their hotel.

·         Travel Expenses a Taxpayer Can’t Deduct. Some types of travel do not qualify for a tax deduction. For example, a taxpayer can’t deduct their costs if a significant part of the trip involves recreation or vacation.

For more on these rules, see Publication 526, Charitable Contributions. Get it on IRS.gov/forms at any time.

This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific, individualized tax advice as individual situations will vary.  Royal Alliance Associates, Inc., Georgetown Capital and its advisors are not engaged in rendering tax advice.

These links are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only. We assume no liability for any inaccuracies, errors or omissions in or from any data or other information provided on the pages, or for any actions taken in reliance on any such data or information.

Prepared by the IRS.  For more information go to www.irs.gov.

Securities and investment advisory services may not be available in all states.

Representatives offer Securities and Advisory Services through Royal Alliance Associates, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC and a registered investment advisor.

Insurance services offered through Georgetown Capital Group, which is independent of Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. with separate ownership, and is not registered as a broker-dealer or investment advisor.

 Joseph V. Curatolo, President of Georgetown Capital Group

5350 Main Street, Williamsville, NY 14221

Phone #(716) 633-9800  Toll Free 1 (800) 648-8091  Fax #(716) 633-9789

www.georgetowncapital.com

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