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‘5 to Drive’ Campaign Helps Parents Protect Teen Drivers | Families

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‘5 to Drive’ Campaign Helps Parents Protect Teen Drivers
Families, Health
‘5 to Drive’ Campaign Helps Parents Protect Teen Drivers

 

The Resource Training Center, based in Amherst, is joining with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to promote the “5 to Drive” campaign during National Teen Driver Safety Week, Oct. 18-24. The campaign aims to help parents talk to their teen drivers about the rules of the road.

“Even though your teens might be gaining some independence and getting older, protecting them from harm shouldn’t stop now,” said Monica Farrar, director of The Resource Training Center and “Alive at 25,” a program created specifically for young drivers. “The ‘5 to Drive’ campaign will give parents the tools they need to keep their teen drivers safe.”

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for U.S. teens 15 to 19 years old. In 2013, 2,614 teen (15- to 19-year-old) passenger vehicle drivers were involved in fatal crashes. 

The “5 to Drive” campaign addresses the five most dangerous and deadly behaviors for teen drivers. The idea behind the campaign is to give parents the words to use when they talk with their teens about the rules of the road. NHTSA’s website, www.safercar.gov/parents, has detailed information and statistics about the five rules designed to help save the lives of teen drivers.

The “5 to Drive” rules for parents to share with their teens are:

No drinking and driving. Almost one out of five (19 percent) of the young drivers (15 to 19 years old) involved in fatal crashes had been drinking, even though they were too young to legally buy or possess alcohol.

Buckle up: Every trip, every time, front seat and back. Sixty four percent of all the young (13- to 19-year-old) passengers of teen (15- to 19-year-old) drivers who died in motor vehicle crashes in 2013 weren’t restrained.

Put it down. One text or call could wreck it all. The age group of 15 to 19 years old has the highest percentage of drivers who were distracted by cell phone use and involved in a fatal crash. In 2013, 156 people were killed in crashes that involved a distracted teen driver.

Stop speeding before it stops you. In 2013, almost one-third (29 percent) of teen drivers involved in a fatal crash were speeding.
No more than one passenger at a time. The risk of a fatal crash goes up with each additional passenger.

“We are hoping that Teen Driver Safety Week and the ‘5 to Drive’ campaign will get the word out to all parents of teens,” said Farrar. “Don’t stop protecting them now that they can drive. They need you now more than ever!”

For more information about Teen Driver Safety Week and the “5 to Drive” campaign, please visit www.safercar.gov/parents.

Located at 4255 Harlem Road, Amherst, The Resource Training Center offers a wide variety of services, including the New York State Drinking Driver Program for individuals convicted of an alcohol- or drug-related driving violation, and Alive at 25, an innovative program that teaches young drivers to change how they approach driving. For more information, please call 983-2258, email info@wnyresourcetraining.org or visit www.wnyresourcetraining.org. You can also follow The Resource Training Center on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/The-Resource-Training-Center/112019195650348 or Twitter (@monica_farrar) for frequent updates.

 

 

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